8 LIFE SKILLS YOU CAN TEACH YOUR CHILD WITH ONE TOY

HOW TO PLAY WITH HEXACTLY- a toy review

The first idea that comes to most parents mind when they see these hexagon building blocks is to build with it existing and imaginary structures. However, using this toy you can teach your toddler a variety of life skills even though it is recommended for preschoolers and up.

I introduce toys to children as soon as the child can play with them safely with my supervision. At 12-14-months of age the child is ready to learn from this toy. Younger children put everything in their mouth and the single hexagon is too small to hand it to them. A 12-month-old might still be mouthing so in that case do not hand them the single hexagon yet. However, you can play with the other, larger pieces. Use this toy to teach them that they cannot mouth everything.

If you want to hand the toy to the child to play independently with, than this toy should be given to children 3+. Just like the package says. Probably even better to give it to a 4-5-year-old. The 5-year-old will have the interest, the understanding, the patience and the cognitive/motor capacity to disciple what this toy can offer.

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7 SKILLS YOU CAN TEACH YOUR BABY USING PUZZLES

puzzles are fun for all ages

Puzzles are not a toy that we can hand our babies to play independently with. Puzzles have many obstacles for a mind that have not seen puzzles yet. Playing with peg puzzles engages new sensations – new smell, new images, new movements, new concepts ext in the baby’s developing mind.

 

puzzles are fun for all ages

Puzzles are versatile toys and educational tools
“They are fun for all ages.”

The beginner puzzles are peg puzzles. The large knob puzzles are a good toy from age 6-7 months. The small peg puzzles can be introduced at 10-11 months of age.

I prefer the small knob puzzles. The large knob is good for someone with weak hands and severe muscular challenges. Babies with no challenges usually graduate to the small peg puzzles in 2-3 months.

What do I do with peg puzzles?

First of all, I consider them tools, not toys.

  1. Teach imitation
  2. Teach matching
  3. Teach vocabulary
  4. Teach sounds and words
  5. Teach concepts i.e.: colors, counting
  6. Teach bending the knees and other motor skills
  7. Teach following directions Continue Reading

WHY IS MY BABY NOT WALKING? NOT EVEN TRYING!

rational mind

Because it is as hard for him.
It is as hard for him to attempt to walk as it would be for you to cross to the other side on a thin log 15 feet high over a fast running stream.

He thinks in the now. In the present moment, or Now it is hard to walk for him, impossible perhaps. So why would he try?

His rational mind is not mature yet to predict the future. His brain can not assist him to see beyond a certain point. Without the rational mind, he does not see that the effort he has to put into learning a difficult task will pay him off later. He wants a cause and effect now. If his actions do not give him satisfaction in the moment he will try something else. So he chooses a very smart route. He adapts.

rational mind

Even though adults have their rational mind developed well, adults don’t act that much different either

We all adapt differently. Some of us try walking with a different gait pattern. Some of us try locomotion with a wheelchair. Some of us have bodies that can not move according to our will at all.

WHAT IS YOUR CHILD’S GROSS MOTOR PERSONALITY?

Gross motor skills and your child's personality

What is personality?  “It is a set of individual differences that are affected by the development of an individual: values, attitudes, personal memories, social relationships, habits, and skills.”  This also including gross motor skills.

I wonder, how much each skill affects our children’s personality?

 

My kids could not avoid their physical therapist mama teaching them rolling, sitting, crawling. They could have learned on their own but I wanted to give them a head start in locomotion. The results were very different. They both taught me many valuable if very different lessons.

My daughter, a very strong girl, (my perpetual mover) thrived so well with the extra training, her gross motor skills developed so fast, that she crawled at 5 and ½ months. However, my laid back, low muscle tone son would not even sit independently by 7 and ½ months but decided to show off a skill set of sitting, crawling and pull to stand all in one day. Clearly their genetically given muscular tone, balancing skills affected how and when they learned to sit and crawl.

Up to this day, my children’s gross motor skills are vastly different. They also have very different personalities, different interests in sports and almost every area.

Is our personality a collection of skills or does our personality directs the development of our skills?

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